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Do you ever disconnect?

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Last post 18/08/2018

Posted by LadyLeslie

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      Original post
      Poll

      Do you ever disconnect?

      Yes
      No
      Everything but never my phone
      I must have the internet
      4 votes cast
      Please login to vote

      Do you ever disconnect?

        If they have a poll button... I am going to create a poll. 

        I tried to post as a normal thread and kept getting technical difficulties.

        I went on vacation and disconnected from everything that I could. (* I had my phone on for emergencies, but did not use it). 

        No internet, no phone*, no computer etc... it was great.

        No right or wrong in this thread ... to each his own.

        Some were glued to their phones with beautiful scenery surrounding them. (If that is how they enjoy themselves ... glad that they do).

        I do this on days off when I want to do so.

        Feel free to add comments to voting or not.🤔☺

          I also disconnected from the news. 

          The news doesn't go away... I felt the need to go away. If news needed my attention ... I would have heard or seen it during a visit to a few touristy stores or restaurants ... I was not that  far off in a remote area ... but was away far enough to enjoy peace through scenery ... and among nature ...

          😎😀

            I keep getting bounced on and off the Net, on and off online, at my home I.S.P. connection. If this keeps up, I might disconnect for good, at home. 

            And now someone has gone into my f.b., hacked it and turned the language from English to Arabic, and I don't know how to get English back 'cause I can't read Arabic. This happened once before, and I can't recall how I got English back.

              and somebody hacked into my p.c. at home the other night, was about to make it crash and the I.S.P. crash, and I had to pay someone online $200 to fix it and then got scared they weren't who they said they were, and would wipe out my bank account. They had claimed to be from Microsoft.

                Yikes, so sorry, Susy!  Hope you can get things straightened out soon!

                I think it's good to disconnect once in a while.   The few times when my laptop has been down, and I was without the internet, it was very difficult for me, and made me realize I was too addicted to it, and had to tell myself "whatever is on there that you haven't seen yet will still be there when you check later." lol   Anyway,  it's good to take time to enjoy life without it for a bit, and remember how life was before it... and just go for a walk, visit a museum or have lunch with friends.  I'm one of the last people on earth to still have a flip phone   (I call it my Star Trek communicator, lol) and I don't use it for internet access at all, but I like it that way... it's less complicated.  It's the addiction to having to check what's online that's the problem, not the devices or laptops.

                  SusyLuvsPaul wrote:

                  and somebody hacked into my p.c. at home the other night, was about to make it crash and the I.S.P. crash, and I had to pay someone online $200 to fix it and then got scared they weren't who they said they were, and would wipe out my bank account. They had claimed to be from Microsoft.

                  I hate to say it, but unless you yourself called your internet service provider for help, you just got screwed. ☹️

                    Yes, I called it myself, and looks like it wasn't a scam and was what they said it was. Thank God.  And I google searched how to switch back to English on f.b., a while ago, and it worked. Maybe it was something I did there to make it change to another language. Stuff can happen so fast, online.

                      SusyLuvsPaul wrote:

                      Yes, I called it myself, and looks like it wasn't a scam and was what they said it was. Thank God.  And I google searched how to switch back to English on f.b., a while ago, and it worked. Maybe it was something I did there to make it change to another language. Stuff can happen so fast, online.

                      Good news! Wonder why you had to pay $200 though? Did they explain why?

                        Microsoft had notified me, my p.c. was acting up all crazy and they let me know someone had hacked it and it was gonna crash if I didn't get it fixed and I was directed to that agency that works for them and they fixed it and added protection, this is a new puter and I was remiss in getting security for it soon enough. This security system will last a year and then must be renewed for a one time fee of fifty dollars for another year. In the meantime, if any tech issues, they'll assist me and it won't cost anything.

                          Along these same lines, I just got this email:

                          AARP Fraud Watch

                              No, Miscrosoft is Not Calling You about a Virus

                              Dear Nancy,

                              Scammers pretending to be from computer companies rely on successful tech support scams to steal your money, gain access to your computer, or both.

                              How It Works:

                              • You get a call or see a pop-up message on your computer warning that you have a virus (the caller will claim to be from Microsoft, Apple or another well-known tech company).
                              • They convince you to provide remote access to your computer so they can show you the ‘problem’ – and then pull up benign data that looks threatening to convince you to pay them to fix it.
                              • While on your system, they could install software that puts your computer and the information you store on it at risk.
                              • In the end, they will ask you for your credit card number to charge you for the repair, and will try signing you up for a worthless maintenance plan. 

                                  What You Should Know:

                                  • An urgent call from a supposed tech company warning you of a virus is a scammer.
                                  • Rely on on-screen messages from your software security that will prompt you to do things like install updates to your security system.
                                  • A follow-on scheme involves the tech company calling you back one day to claim it’s going out of business or it’s offering refunds for some other reason, and they will ask you for your bank or credit card information to process your refund.

                                  What You Should Do:

                                  • Hang up on anyone claiming to be from tech support warning of a virus on your computer.
                                  • If you get a pop-up alert that appears to freeze your computer, don’t follow the instructions. Just shut down your computer and restart to get rid of the phony ad.
                                  • If you are concerned about the security of your computer, go to someone you trust for help. Don’t do an internet search for “tech support” as you may end up on a scammer’s site.

                                          When it comes to fraud, vigilance is our number one weapon. You have the power to protect yourself and your loved ones from scams. Please share this alert with friends and family.

                                          Sincerely,

                                          Kathy StokesFraud Watch Network

                                          P.S. Spotted a scam?  Tell us about it.  Our scam-tracking map gives you information about the latest scams targeting people in your state.  You’ll also find first-hand accounts from scam-spotters who are sharing their experiences so you know how to protect yourself and your family.

                                           

                                          The AARP Fraud Watch Network connects you to the latest information about ID theft and fraud so you can safeguard your personal information and your pocketbook.Visit the site ›GET HELP:If you or someone you know has been a victim of identity theft or fraud, contact the AARP Foundation Fraud Fighter Center at 877-908-3360.FORWARD TO A FRIEND:Share this alert with your family and friends so they know how to spot the common strategies scammers use and have the tools they need to defend themselves against their tricks.Forward this alert ›AARP logoAARP.org  |  Join us:  Facebook  TwitterAARP601 E Street NWWashington, DC 20049AARP Privacy PolicyUnsubscribe from AARP Fraud Watch Network or unsubscribe from all AARP e-mails

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                                            well, my bank account was not wiped out, yes I did fear it might be a scam, but was given all kinds of info to denote otherwise, and my bank account has not been wiped out. 

                                              You said you called Microsoft, but why not your internet service provider (like mine is AT&T)?  Then you said Microsoft directed you to someone else. I’m not saying you will have your bank account wiped out, but I think you got scammed out of $200. If the computer is new, either the manufacturer (like HP or whatever) or your internet service provider should have helped you for free. 

                                                why didn't they wipe it all out, if it was a big con...if it was it sure was an elaborate one, I won't go into all the details 'cause this makes me want to f-----------g   kill myself

                                                You're the big school teacher or police person of the board, always correcting someone...this was useful info you provided, though, but it made me feel real bad. 

                                                  Susy, I am just trying to help you out so this doesn’t happen to you again. I myself had a problem with my laptop several years ago and I called someone who I thought was with Norton Anti-Virus, which is what I have on my computer. I ended up paying some money out like you did and the laptop never seemed to run any faster.  I realized I had most likely been scammed, but luckily there were no other problems. If your computer is running okay now (and in English) and you got either Norton Anti-Virus or McAfee or something, then you should be fine. Most of these scammers are just legal enough to be able to say they are providing a service. That’s how they get away with it. They’re not out to hack into your entire life or something. Sorry I made you feel bad, but you really need to be careful when it comes to your computer. If there is a Best Buy near you, their Geek Squad is really good.

                                                    I like to disconnect on my terms not some hacker / scammer/ someone who gets their kicks off of knowing they caused someone a lot of frustration and pain in the ass trying to get it working again.

                                                    I once wrote here that ( as a conspiracy theory) the ones causing the problems were the same ones making money fixing the problems. * equivalent to: "The Mob" would get protection money from business owners.  For those who would not pay ... their business places got robbed or broken up or avoided by the public because of a threat to customers etc... the mob offered protection again and the business owners now wanted it. 

                                                    Most of us here have run into computer problems that have needed support in attempt to get it going again ...

                                                    I used to tell friends and family how to avoid scams and clicking on things etc... they would do something and I helped them to get it going. I would once again tell them to be cautious of these traps that seemed like common sense to avoid. Simple pop up warnings and messages used to look so obvious to me. I clicked on something that was a well done imitation of my computer error message. A simple page won't display try again type of message. (* a message I may have seen hundreds of times back then). I clicked on it and could not take the click back. It locked. There were times in the past I would reboot or restore it to a known last time it worked okay. This one stuck. I knew it was trouble because I saw warnings of this from a company email. They wanted money. I knew it was a scam. I did not want to lose my files. I couldn't get it going. I knew I would have to format it load everything back. I had to get someone who knew how to transfer my old files and save them on another computer (**today's world this can be done on the cloud). I had start over. I lost some stuff (minimum). I was irritated the most by having to find updates, drivers, re-entering internet start up codes etc (again today's computer stuff is found in other ways). It took hours and hours to get it to where I wanted it to be. I also did not want to pay $$$ .. . In that case I would have bought a new system or new software. *** Next I would say even if you have Anti-virus stuff make sure to do updates. As soon as the bad guys know what it stops,,, they come up with something new. The updates have a chance to catch this. The one that locked my computer snuck past my protection. They came up with a fix about a month later (which is long in the computer world).

                                                    I was going to joke: make sure you have a good friend that knows the computer well enough to help you out. * save some scam money or if it does cost money or a dinner at least it is going to someone you know. 

                                                    If you cannot get phone support for free from the computer manufacture, whoever sold it to you, or your internet provider... then the idea of the "Geek Squad" or similar does seem like the way to go. They have the business to back them - you will pay but will know they will charge as needed and not scam you. 

                                                    Microsoft gave me a high figure and it was bleep you in my thoughts. For that amount I could buy new software or apply it towards a replacement. 

                                                    Wow that was a lot of words. 

                                                    Don't feel bad ... it happens to many.

                                                    These scammers have to be good to make a living off of doing this ... it is their job.

                                                     

                                                      Susy, Nancy isn't the school teacher of the board.  She's the nurse.  Sometimes they tell you things you don't want to hear, but it's mostly for your benefit in the long run.

                                                      From what you've described, I'd agree that this was a scam.  Maybe you feel bad about falling for it, but the more you know, the safer you'll be in the future.  Everyone thinks they're smarter than criminals, but some criminals can be ingenious.  If they put their talents to good instead of bad, the world would be a better place.  But that's true of everybody.

                                                       

                                                        I'm glad AARP is sending out that kind of information.  A lot of people are computer illiterate - whoever is fixing this site, for example - and the elderly are especially vulnerable.

                                                        The good news, or bad news, is that as more cynical generations become older, they'll be less likely to fall for scams that prey on an older person's trust.  But there will always be scams.  The love of money is the root of all internet evil.

                                                          Yeah it hurts me I was so stupid (and getting hurt in the pocketbook's one of the worst boo boos !), and to top it off the screen on that particular little PC has frozen !! After idiotically shelling out two hundred bucks for them to fix it (and I could have bought another one for that, it's just an HP notebook type thingie) but when I I told him that, he claimed well the "hackers will crash your I.S.P,"something outrageous like that, that couldn't happen. I was all around dumb. On the bright side, this mishap might pay off some of my seemingly endless, vast mountain of bad karma...at  least...they claimed they will fix any upcoming puter probs for the next year "for free" (after that, charge fifty bucks a year for tech help"...I should call and tell them the damn puter screen's frozen up, and after paying them all that, and see what they say and if they can fix it from India or Pakistan where they were calling from, sounded like. I've got another bigger laptop which hasn't been affected, course it still has months of Norton protection left. I hadn't bought protection for the little notebook yet, and see what havoc that neglect wrought...I'll not be that careless and reckless again

                                                            SusyLuvsPaul wrote:

                                                            Yeah it hurts me I was so stupid (and getting hurt in the pocketbook's one of the worst boo boos !), and to top it off the screen on that particular little PC has frozen !! After idiotically shelling out two hundred bucks for them to fix it (and I could have bought another one for that, it's just an HP notebook type thingie) but when I I told him that, he claimed well the "hackers will crash your I.S.P,"something outrageous like that, that couldn't happen. I was all around dumb. On the bright side, this mishap might pay off some of my seemingly endless, vast mountain of bad karma...at  least...they claimed they will fix any upcoming puter probs for the next year "for free" (after that, charge fifty bucks a year for tech help"...I should call and tell them the damn puter screen's frozen up, and after paying them all that, and see what they say and if they can fix it from India or Pakistan where they were calling from, sounded like. I've got another bigger laptop which hasn't been affected, course it still has months of Norton protection left. I hadn't bought protection for the little notebook yet, and see what havoc that neglect wrought...I'll not be that careless and reckless again

                                                            I would caution you about calling them back. Did they ask you for “remote access” to your notebook? If so, they will ask again and you don’t want that. You could take it to wherever you bought it, or to the Best Buy Geek Squad, but that might cost too much. Do you know that Norton will protect (I believe) 5 computers for one yearly price? I have it on 2 laptops and one desktop (which I unplugged and disconnected from the internet since I never use it - it still has Windows XP on it!) Lol!

                                                            Just get on your other laptop and log in to your Norton Account and there will be info on how to add the other computer. You say the screen is frozen. Did you reboot it and it’s still frozen? (Do a manual shut down by pushing the power button, wait 30 seconds and press the power button again)  It will probably tell you it wasn’t shut down properly, just ignore that and select Enter. It will then reboot. 

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