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England, the Internet, and Me

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Last post 21/12/2019

Posted by SusyLuvsPaul

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      England, the Internet, and Me

      When I first went online in 2000, I "talked" to legions of Englishmen (sometimes to Irish, Scots and the Welsh, too) to find out seemingly first hand about life in Jolly Olde and to get a feel for the country, how it looks and a little of its history--for example, if you're from Newcastle you're an "Orangeman," and similar intriguing sometimes perplexing tidbits. Andy in the North told me England is "backward" and provincial, but I don't see how a legendary land with all that rich history and culture can really be "backward" and wondered why he disparaged his own region. I acquired a vivid sense of Northern England from his descriptions, especially of Manchester and Liverpool, and Justin from Cumbria shared fantastic pictures and info about the Lake District. I was shocked and enthralled by how ancient his village looked. The place must be teeming with spirits (ghosts). His downtown looked 1,000 years old! A strapping lad from Bournmouth, a night club bouncer, came across as strikingly vivid with his cheeky Brit slang he used, I felt I was right there.
      Kids in the Yahoo U.K. Chat Rooms where I hung out for hours seemed mainly a surly, smart-mouthed lot resentful of my intrusions on their Brit cyber territory, wanting to know about them. I sometimes got bashed black and blue, verbally, and got the impression the British (English ones in England) aren't very friendly, overall. (A few exceptions were extra personable, chatty and warm.) They seemed a jealous bunch too, full of seething envy. I got that impression I think because most of the posters in the U.K. chatrooms were very young and avidly desirous of being more, getting more and seeing more of life, wanting more more more--some wanted to get off their little island, and didn't see how they would achieve that. But I sort of loved them although it wasn't reciprocated, just for their making me feel like I was right there in England, in spirit if not physically present.
      Some informants were older, and successful--I remember investment banker Chris Alpine (not his real name) shared about Shakespeare festivals in Stratford-Upon-Avon, but he also described outings to London bars with his chums to cheat on their wives and bragged about how many pounds he had and would make in the future. Helen in Dundee, Scotland and Kay in London are two female Net friends I've "known" online for donkey's years who have made me feel immersed in contemporary Brit life and lore, soaked in it--Helen was a London native and claimed she hates London. I don't see how anybody could. Kay seems like the nicest person in England. I felt sometimes almost the only friendly one. (TO BE CONTINUED)

        Interesting...fyi, may have been a typo, but it's "Welsh" not Welch.

          I'd finally wised up, and realized I could only have really good in-depth discussions about Britain, with British women. Ninety-nine percent of the men were fascinated with sexuality and wanted to talk dirty. To be honest. (Probably it's like that world-wide.) They wished to explore that one hot button topic in great detail. A blonde blue-eyed bloke from Wales led me down the wrong path (but in a literary way!) with his "dirty story writing contest" he lured me into (I deemed mine superior to his!). My two "greatest hits" involved the winsome Druid Fruitella (I love that name) and the uber-hedonistic pagan god Pan who frolicked in lovely moonlight-drenched English gardens. And the tale of Prince Andrew (!) who participated as guide during a long stretch Limo ride touring the Lake District with a sexy American girl who had won a competition to see Cumbria. Their ride got pretty raunchy with "Randy Andy." I can't stand the thought of someone like Paul McCartney (my favorite Englishman) reading those. I'd be so embarrassed ops: . This little writing contest happened almost 16 years ago, however, so why feel guilty now? Also it was creative imaginative writing and "all in our heads." We weren't actually getting busy with anything except our naughty fingers flying across the damn devil machine keyboards.
          Yes, indeed, Anglophiles and English Literature students can really go to town (London Town) on the Web-- invisible minds in Jolly Olde, The Olde Sod which isn't an exotic steamy hot tropical island, but rather a quaint cold scenic a bit isolated Northern island off the Continent. It's endlessly special, unique, for its magnificent English language, rich cultured history, glorious former Empire, and gorgeous countryside. Even more so for its people. And the music! Beatles, anyone? And British cinema. The literature. Great actors and plays. Willie the Shake.
          David Hare.
          How do you feel about England?--Susy

            Love it! Am going back there next year for the 5th time since 1980.

              You're very fortunate Nancy to have been there so often and going again. I should have gone those few times I thought I could afford to, even if just on a bus tour. I'd have been afraid of the plane trip although it doesn't take all that long to get there. Afraid of the plane cracking up like an egg discarding the flyers.
              I feel like watching Keira Knightley's "Pride and Prejudice" again, it imparts an effective England fix and the Beatrice Potter movie showcasing the Lake District. I just read a Stella Gibbons novel (she wrote "Cold Comfort Farm"). All of hers are delightful. And P.G. Wodehouse. Reading English novels often gives a comfy, cozy warm feeling. I imagine being there would if one is in a good situation. Living there. There is a certain charming cute quaintness that isn't just a fond deluded image. Although a bloke in the East End told me it's worse than what "Eastenders" soap opera depicts. I'm going to google image search Sussex, I think it's a suburb of London sort of with a country feel that was featured in a Christian Bale Emily Watson movie I liked. Or perhaps it's actually far and deep into the English countryside.

                Susy England is really beautiful, hopefully you can get over there, or take a cruise instead of a plane! You would love it! It's much more medieval than I ever imagined, with timbered villages, castles, stately manor houses...flowers everywhere!! June is a good month to miss the rain. March on the other hand , is very windy and rainy. You need to buy a British umbrella, the American ones cannot take it and I have the video of mine tuning inside out a hundred times to prove it!

                They seem to speak a different language and everything seems to be pronounced and spelled differently. They are the first English speakers though, so they must be right The pubs are so cozy on a cold rainy day/night....you can just imagine someone sitting in the same seat as you, hundreds of years ago. The history and architecture are to be treasured and enjoyed, be sure to bring a camera!

                There are ghosts, which I didn't believe in until my visit to Hanpton Palace...oodles of olde wonderful things from out of history books everywhere! The people can be reserved until they get to know you. It's very very important to be polite and mind your manners ...rudeness is frowned upon. Things are much more subtle, there's more in what you don't say as opposed to what you say. I'm sure you've gotten that from the literature and movies you've watched.

                That's just my take... I love England to bits, however, they won't give Americans visas to move over there Still, it's not to be missed. When you get there, you will chide yourself for not hopping the pond sooner!

                  SusyLuvsPaul:You're very fortunate Nancy to have been there so often and going again. I should have gone those few times I thought I could afford to, even if just on a bus tour. I'd have been afraid of the plane trip although it doesn't take all that long to get there. Afraid of the plane cracking up like an egg discarding the flyers.
                  I feel like watching Keira Knightley's "Pride and Prejudice" again, it imparts an effective England fix and the Beatrice Potter movie showcasing the Lake District. I just read a Stella Gibbons novel (she wrote "Cold Comfort Farm"). All of hers are delightful. And P.G. Wodehouse. Reading English novels often gives a comfy, cozy warm feeling. I imagine being there would if one is in a good situation. Living there. There is a certain charming cute quaintness that isn't just a fond deluded image. Although a bloke in the East End told me it's worse than what "Eastenders" soap opera depicts. I'm going to google image search Sussex, I think it's a suburb of London sort of with a country feel that was featured in a Christian Bale Emily Watson movie I liked. Or perhaps it's actually far and deep into the English countryside.

                  Where Paul lives in East Sussex is southeast of London by the coast. (not a suburb of London) West Sussex is closer and Surrey is even closer. Check out a map.

                  http://www.touristnetuk.com/south-east-england/london/map-london-south.jpg

                  See Esher (in Surrey) here where George & Pattie lived (southwest of London) Weybridge, Surrey is not shown, but was nearby.

                  http://members.madasafish.com/~cj_whitehound/Fanfic/Location_Location/artwork/around_London.jpg

                  This one shows Rye in East Sussex:

                  http://conferences.brightoncentre.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/South-East-detailed-high-res-map.jpg

                    Nancy, thanks. I wonder if Rye is where a statue of Linda McCartney was erected.

                      SusyLuvsPaul:Nancy, thanks. I wonder if Rye is where a statue of Linda McCartney was erected.

                      There's one in Campbeltown Susy.

                      http://static7.imagecollect.com/preview/560/ad78c93f095c3e9

                        love2travel:Susy England is really beautiful, hopefully you can get over there, or take a cruise instead of a plane! You would love it! It's much more medieval than I ever imagined, with timbered villages, castles, stately manor houses...flowers everywhere!! June is a good month to miss the rain. March on the other hand , is very windy and rainy. You need to buy a British umbrella, the American ones cannot take it and I have the video of mine tuning inside out a hundred times to prove it!

                        They seem to speak a different language and everything seems to be pronounced and spelled differently. They are the first English speakers though, so they must be right The pubs are so cozy on a cold rainy day/night....you can just imagine someone sitting in the same seat as you, hundreds of years ago. The history and architecture are to be treasured and enjoyed, be sure to bring a camera!

                        There are ghosts, which I didn't believe in until my visit to Hanpton Palace...oodles of olde wonderful things from out of history books everywhere! The people can be reserved until they get to know you. It's very very important to be polite and mind your manners ...rudeness is frowned upon. Things are much more subtle, there's more in what you don't say as opposed to what you say. I'm sure you've gotten that from the literature and movies you've watched.

                        That's just my take... I love England to bits, however, they won't give Americans visas to move over there Still, it's not to be missed. When you get there, you will chide yourself for not hopping the pond sooner!

                        Thanks so much for all this insider info, Loves2Travel, I know you've been there many times and I'm jelly, but glad for you! "They seem to speak a different language, and everything is spelled and pronounced differently" ---I'm sure I'd fairly often have to say "What?" after being addressed, LOL, could be awkward. I also might blurt out the wrong thing sometimes, and offend, just from being so excited to be there. Be tactless. Why won't they let Yankees live there? That's awful. I thought Madonna and Sylvia Plath, among others, lived there. Henry James and T.S. Eliot (?). Plath is buried there. A facebook Brit friend showed her grave. He showed some pix of Yorkshire buildings and stuff, I'll go back and scrutinize them. Of course I've google image searched a lot of Brit locales. And pour over picture books and movies. I don't think I'll ever get to see the British Isles in person (sobs). Charlotte Bronte and Jane Austen, for example, paint such vivid portraits one feels well acquainted with all the charming quaintness. The ambience and daily life and atmosphere and the land and architecture and the people.

                          SusyLuvsPaul:

                          love2travel:Susy England is really beautiful, hopefully you can get over there, or take a cruise instead of a plane! You would love it! It's much more medieval than I ever imagined, with timbered villages, castles, stately manor houses...flowers everywhere!! June is a good month to miss the rain. March on the other hand , is very windy and rainy. You need to buy a British umbrella, the American ones cannot take it and I have the video of mine tuning inside out a hundred times to prove it!

                          They seem to speak a different language and everything seems to be pronounced and spelled differently. They are the first English speakers though, so they must be right The pubs are so cozy on a cold rainy day/night....you can just imagine someone sitting in the same seat as you, hundreds of years ago. The history and architecture are to be treasured and enjoyed, be sure to bring a camera!

                          There are ghosts, which I didn't believe in until my visit to Hanpton Palace...oodles of olde wonderful things from out of history books everywhere! The people can be reserved until they get to know you. It's very very important to be polite and mind your manners ...rudeness is frowned upon. Things are much more subtle, there's more in what you don't say as opposed to what you say. I'm sure you've gotten that from the literature and movies you've watched.

                          That's just my take... I love England to bits, however, they won't give Americans visas to move over there Still, it's not to be missed. When you get there, you will chide yourself for not hopping the pond sooner!

                          Thanks so much for all this insider info, Loves2Travel, I know you've been there many times and I'm jelly, but glad for you! "They seem to speak a different language, and everything is spelled and pronounced differently" ---I'm sure I'd fairly often have to say "What?" after being addressed, LOL, could be awkward. I also might blurt out the wrong thing sometimes, and offend, just from being so excited to be there. Be tactless. Why won't they let Yankees live there? That's awful. I thought Madonna and Sylvia Plath, among others, lived there. Henry James and T.S. Eliot (?). Plath is buried there. A facebook Brit friend showed her grave. He showed some pix of Yorkshire buildings and stuff, I'll go back and scrutinize them. Of course I've google image searched a lot of Brit locales. And pour over picture books and movies. I don't think I'll ever get to see the British Isles in person (sobs). Charlotte Bronte and Jane Austen, for example, paint such vivid portraits one feels well acquainted with all the charming quaintness. The ambience and daily life and atmosphere and the land and architecture and the people.

                          You're welcome Susy. You're more likely to say "what" due to a regional accent, than to not understanding what they're saying...say in Birmingham or some areas of Scotland. I suppose if you're rich, you can somehow pay for a visa. The rule is, you'd have to have a talent that no one in Britian could do, or a company would have to sponsor you to work there and pay something like a $1,000 fee to have you there. However you could move to Ireland and live there two years to get a UK residency. We do the same thing to Brits who try to get a visa here. A friend said they were heavily questioned by our border when coming here with a work visa. So sad, because people there complain all of the EU moves there.

                          You should really go there, you would quickly pick up on the idioms and you have a wide vocabulary and a wealth of knowledge about many British writers, poets etc. You would love it!! Here's some fun reading for you... This is what I was talking about.... http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml. Cheers!

                          I look at London as the Gateway to Civilisation, a hub to see all the art and history of Europe.

                            Thanks again, Love2Travel. I know you know. Those frustrated kids in the Yahoo Chat Rooms reminded me of Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols complaining about the lack of employment opportunities in England, for the youths. I told them the U.S.A. has plenty of areas with a paucity of jobs. ("Sex Pistols" LOL, yes indeed, British men are secretly not as reserved and chilly as they seem

                              SusyLuvsPaul:Thanks again, Love2Travel. I know you know. Those frustrated kids in the Yahoo Chat Rooms reminded me of Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols complaining about the lack of employment opportunities in England, for the youths. I told them the U.S.A. has plenty of areas with a paucity of jobs. ("Sex Pistols" LOL, yes indeed, British men are secretly not as reserved and chilly as they seem

                              I've not been in the Yahoooooo chat rooms, but I imagine many people in chat rooms really loosen up behind their anonymity! I'm sure you've seen enough docudramas and movies, that you know what I'm saying about the unsaid words I like riding the tube at the close of business and watching all the men in pin striped suits! Poems pop into my head

                              Yes, it's shocking that I personally have met people who've just graduated university with valuable degrees, such as law and medical and they're working in the pub for the time being!

                                OOOOH I largely omitted the wonders of Ireland, Scotland and Wales to focus on England. But would love to see it all. Maeve Binchy novels and short stories truly depict Ireland as so charming and warm, its folks not as reserved and reticent as the English can be.