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Vegetarian forms of protein

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Last post 14/12/2015

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      Thinking more and more about vegetarianism.. but how do you get enough protein while still being aware of your fat levels? All these meat replacement products (like quorn) / tofu / bean or nut products seem very high in fat. Curious to learn more about how to make the transition, thanks! Sorry if this is a stupid thread.

        Hummus is an excellent source of protein, vitamins and fiber without having much saturated fat at all.

          Succotash is reportedly very good. I would add pasta or wrap it in a tortilla with onions and a vegi broth. But some folks take issue with wheat, and I don't mean to disagree. I've always enjoyed it, though others may not be able to. There is also vegetarian refried beans in oil that can be used for burritos.

          And Falafels which are fried chick peas, though that adds oil which may be objectionable for others. I would try falafels with a layer of vegi refried beans added to it, but Be Aware That commercial falafels may be deep fried in oil that is also used for frying lamb or other meats. It depends on the restaurant.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Succotash

            Falafel is very healthy. Olive oil adds little fat and tahini is one of the best things you can eat.

              I think of Tahini as "the original Ranch Dressing". The tahini that I've enjoyed is made of sesame oil and garlic.

                I've thought about using tahini as a peanut butter substitute, but it seems wrong.

                  If you are a lacto-oval vegetarian you may choose to use cheese for protein, but be aware that many cheeses use rennet (a butcher product), while other soft cheeses may use gelatin (from the ligaments of animals). So if you go there, you may wish to check the ingredients first.
                  Cheeses do not need to use meat by-products, and there are vegetarian forms of rennet (non-animal) and Kosher Gelatin (non-animal) which are used instead by many cheese manufacturers.

                  I was a lacto-oval vegetarian for quite awhile, until I got thumped by a Hollywood hazing and was forced to eat my meals with a group of very-unsympathetic arty folks. However, I often depended on a clean cottage cheese. And a few of the Loma Linda products.

                    This is one of my biggest questions.....how to keep things creative and get my protein in. When possible, add cheese. Obviously this isn't vegan friendly, but cottage cheese is actually a good protein. Yogurt or sour cream too. Again, only if milk is still part of your diet.

                    I also love lentils, chic peas, and beans. You can throw this into anything. I often make quasadillas with beans, or curried chich peas, or go for tacos but replace the ground beef with lentils. Trust me, this is amazing! I love to eat, so I like to mix it up. Bland food does not appeal to me.

                    I still eat eggs, so I guess I'm an ovatarian and not a vegetarian, but eggs can be thrown into anything too.

                    Tofu is ok in moderation. Just keep in mind that it is high in estrogen.

                    Snack on nuts throughout the day. Almonds, cashews, peanuts. Always a good option.

                    I also make a stir fry with a peanut sauce. It is amazing, especially with some pinapple thrown in, giving it a nice salty sweet appeal.

                    Ok, now I'm hungry.

                      Oh, and for a healthy fat....avacodo all the way! and olive oil.

                        If you don't use dairy products, then be sure to supplement a vegan diet with Vitamin B-12. Amazingly enough, this vitamin is Not supplied by most meats including ground beef / hamburgers, and many people are at risk of a deficiency.

                          I've had no protein issues in the 10 years I've been vegetarian. I only have a lack of vitamin D partly due to living in a non sunny area but I don't drink plain dairy milk. Protein is gained from different sources and can be found in many non meat sources.

                            MaccaMeri:I've had no protein issues in the 10 years I've been vegetarian. I only have a lack of vitamin D partly due to living in a non sunny area but I don't drink plain dairy milk. Protein is gained from different sources and can be found in many non meat sources.

                            I take 6000 units of vitamin D daily. 3000 in the morning & 3000 in the early evening. Vitamin D is one of the most important vitamins. I'm a melanoma cancer survivor & avoid the sun in peak hours when the UV is high. For protein I eat quinoa, lentils & an assortment of beans.

                              I take supplements but am still deficient in Vitamin D, especially D2 which comes from plants. I eat coconut milk yogurt each morning, but it doesn?t seem to help.

                                liv4art:I take supplements but am still deficient in Vitamin D, especially D2 which comes from plants. I eat coconut milk yogurt each morning, but it doesn?t seem to help.

                                I take liquid Vitamin D3 5,000 IU one dropperful a day. It's tasteless and from a company called Complementary Prescriptions, part of Pro Thera.

                                I was very low in Vitamin D and this has really helped. It's partially MCT oil

                                  Vanessa Wichtiger:This is one of my biggest questions.....how to keep things creative and get my protein in. When possible, add cheese. Obviously this isn't vegan friendly, but cottage cheese is actually a good protein. Yogurt or sour cream too. Again, only if milk is still part of your diet.

                                  I also love lentils, chic peas, and beans. You can throw this into anything. I often make quasadillas with beans, or curried chich peas, or go for tacos but replace the ground beef with lentils. Trust me, this is amazing! I love to eat, so I like to mix it up. Bland food does not appeal to me.

                                  I still eat eggs, so I guess I'm an ovatarian and not a vegetarian, but eggs can be thrown into anything too.

                                  Tofu is ok in moderation. Just keep in mind that it is high in estrogen.

                                  I read that lentils are a good substitute for meat, could you boil them and put some kind of meat sauce on them?
                                  Been wanting to use cauliflower (mashed) in place of mashed potatoes.

                                  I read that "lentils can be a meat substitution" do they mean to boil the lentils and put some sort of meat sauce on them or what? thanx for info.
                                  Have been wanting to substitute mashed cauliflower for mashed potatoes.

                                  How do you make your peanut sauce? Thanx for info

                                  Seen lately: Yoplait Cotton Candy Yogurt (ugh)--diabetes waiting to happen

                                    I hate to admit is but I can not cook tofu properly, or at least I don't think I can. Is there someone who can tell me a way to make a nice crispy tofu or recommend a recipe or cook book? I eat it every day, I need the estrogen at my age. ops: hot flash

                                      I slice it and fry it up in a wok with some olive oil, whatever else I'm cooking and a little balsamic vinegar. The spices you use are important since tofu will soak up whatever flavor you add.

                                        HaileyMcComet:I slice it and fry it up in a wok with some olive oil, whatever else I'm cooking and a little balsamic vinegar. The spices you use are important since tofu will soak up whatever flavor you add.

                                        Thanks for responding. So, do you buy the packaged product in the super market? Then drain, or press out the liquid? Do you fry it in hot oil? A little vinegar, never tried that.

                                          I usually get two types of tofu. One comes in a bag and the other is wrapped in plastic. There is no water to drain. If you get the kind that comes in water, you don't have to press it. You can just let it rest or soak it in salt water while you're prepping other things. Or keep it wet. It all depends on what you're doing with it.

                                          There are a million ways to cook tofu. You can even eat it raw, but that's like eating a potato without any seasoning. I mostly fry it, but I've done pretty much everything I can think of with it, except make ice cream. But that's only because I don't make my own ice cream.

                                            HaileyMcComet:I usually get two types of tofu. One comes in a bag and the other is wrapped in plastic. There is no water to drain. If you get the kind that comes in water, you don't have to press it. You can just let it rest or soak it in salt water while you're prepping other things. Or keep it wet. It all depends on what you're doing with it.

                                            There are a million ways to cook tofu. You can even eat it raw, but that's like eating a potato without any seasoning. I mostly fry it, but I've done pretty much everything I can think of with it, except make ice cream. But that's only because I don't make my own ice cream.

                                            That helps, thanks. I will have to keep looking for different kinds of tofu. I did however find baked tofu, a marinated tofu, I'm trying that today. I have Mary's cookbook FOOD now, what a neat cookbook, simple, no stress cooking, the kind I am use to since I spent my life at work not at home cooking.
                                            I really enjoyed her photos too, plus now I know the true meaning of the word wheelbarrow! Never seen that before.

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