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Sometimes she feels so sad

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Last post 09/09/2017

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      So, I wanted so much to see Sir Paul as close as possible. I should have prefaced this by saying that I use a wheelchair. I have seen him perform before, but always on a handicap platform. You see in NJ it seems that if you buy a VIP package and spend a considerable amount of money on tickets, they put you to n a platform or in my case recently they want to move you. I spoke to at least three people from the Prudential Center and Ticketmaster before the tickets went on sale. Yes, If I bought the front row package, I could sit in the front row. Could it be true? I was flying high above the clouds. My joy was short lived. My section C front row seats were essentially taken away. For my "safety" they were moving me to the end of the row whereI would not be able to see Paul. They told me to think about whether or not I wanted to go. I went back and forth on it all summer. Finally, a week before I decided that I couldn't let them do this to me so I decided not to go. It breaks my heart and I have had some new health issues recently so I really needed it, but it is not to be. I asked them to make it possible in the future for all people to be treated equally and to not treat us in this discriminatory way(by the way the person I spoke to admitted it was discrimination.) everyone should be able to see their favorite performer in any way they choose to.

        This makes my blood boil. Your handicap is simply being considered as inconvenient to them.

        Let me get this clear, can I ask you if they gave any reason for this? And who did admit it's discrimination?

          I'm not positive but they never sell front row center. Front row, from what I've heard, is always off to the side. These people at the Prudential Center, apparently didn't know. The center is reserved for people they comp tickets to or move down from the other sections. Again this is only what I've heard. Maybe someone that has bought front row tickets (there are a few here) would be kind enough to speak up & let you know.

            A doctor friend of mine bought front row in Duluth, GA and she was in the side section (on the right as you face the stage) in seat 9 which was about in the center of the section.
            You're correct, they don't sell the center section of rows 1 or 2. I think this lady had a side section (C) because there are always 3 sections across the front (1, 2 and 3 or A, B and C)
            If she was unable to get out of her wheelchair to sit in her seat, they were saying they were going to make her sit at the far end in her wheelchair.
            Agnes, I'm sorry you were not able to see Paul. What is ironic is that the front row people stand the entire time, plastered up against the barrier! Your wheelchair could have been placed in the center directly behind them! Plenty of room.

              Actually, even though people in the front row do stand at the barrier, I don't think there is enough room for a wheelchair to fit there. There isn't that much more room and the seats are usually bolted together and can't be moved out to create more room.

              Also, the venue may not be able to fit a wheelchair in the front row because there are no aisles that break up the row. Front row for Paul is one complete row of 40 or so seats across. If someone exited their seat during a show, there might not be room to pass by the person in the wheelchair, so they might try to just climb over them, which would be dangerous for the person in the chair. So this is probably why the venues want the wheelchairs on the end...a safety reason.

              Apparently, Madison Square Garden does specifically make room for wheelchairs in the front row side sections. You can see it on the seat maps. There are handicapped symbols in the front of each section.

              Agnes, I am so sorry that you won't get to see Paul from the front in NJ. But I really do think the venue did this for your safety. I do think that they could do better to accommodate wheelchairs in the front rows and create space for them. ð??

                I'd make a big stink about it, and post all over the internet - including any e-mails/messages with anyone that might make them look bad. The squeaky wheel gets the grease, especially when celebrities need to save face.

                  thenightfish:Actually, even though people in the front row do stand at the barrier, I don't think there is enough room for a wheelchair to fit there. There isn't that much more room and the seats are usually bolted together and can't be moved out to create more room.

                  Also, the venue may not be able to fit a wheelchair in the front row because there are no aisles that break up the row. Front row for Paul is one complete row of 40 or so seats across. If someone exited their seat during a show, there might not be room to pass by the person in the wheelchair, so they might try to just climb over them, which would be dangerous for the person in the chair. So this is probably why the venues want the wheelchairs on the end...a safety reason.

                  Apparently, Madison Square Garden does specifically make room for wheelchairs in the front row side sections. You can see it on the seat maps. There are handicapped symbols in the front of each section.

                  Agnes, I am so sorry that you won't get to see Paul from the front in NJ. But I really do think the venue did this for your safety. I do think that they could do better to accommodate wheelchairs in the front rows and create space for them. ð??

                  In Duluth, GA there was plenty of room, but I see your point.

                    Shame. Bruce Springsteen had a man in a wheelchair front row center when I saw him at MSG last year- and that was a GA section, not seated.

                      This fan deserves to be brought onstage! You should go, sit wherever you can, and make a big sign that says "Paul! They took away my front row seat becaue of my wheels!"

                      It is definitely a venue issue, so I say raise some cain about it. you have the ADA on your side and some admissions of guilt from the venue. I hope you decide to go Agnes!

                        That's a disgrace. You should write to Paul's management company, MPL.
                        You should also contact the local media outlets where the venue is located. Especially if they admitted it was discrimination. You could sue the venue. They not only owe you a front row seat, but an apology as well!

                          Any update on this? If it's purely down to safety hazard I'm afraid it's fair enough. (Although I still think they could work around it if they wanted to.) The "they admitted it's discrimination" part makes it super wonky, and definitely needs a follow-up by someone from MPL/the venue.

                            FWIW, I know it's not much use for you now since you were planning for NJ, but MSG does indeed have a wheelchair-accessible front row. I was just in the front for a couple of non-Paul shows and there's a large gap between the seats and the barricade. There were a couple of folks in wheelchairs by me, closer to the center even, and the seats had been removed for them. During the encore they let us go up to the barricade, and one of the ladies in a wheelchair went up as well and said she could still see from her chair. It was amazing!

                            I don't know Prudential well, but did they tell you explicitly that you wouldn't be able to see Paul from the side? I was near the side-most edges in my MSG seats and still had a crystal clear, unobstructed, up close view of everything going on. It might not be the supremely optimal location for constant eye contact with Paul in the center, but he works the stage a lot so there would probably be opportunities for interaction. I think when he's on the piano he'd either be looking right towards you if you're on the left, or you'd get a great view from the right (seriously! ). Plus I think you'd be going to the soundcheck as well? That's of course a huge bonus.

                            I know it's down to the wire, but I really hope something works out for you!