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The Future of Food: the McCartneys’ tips on how to eat more sustainably

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Last post 10/11/2019

Posted by LadyLeslie

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      Excerpts from article published today in The Sunday Times : The Future of Food: the McCartneys’ tips on how to eat more sustainably

      What food is truly sustainable? The McCartney family, rapper Loyle Carner, chef Douglas McMaster and climate activist Anna Taylor tell allLisa Markwell

      The Sunday Times, November 10 2019, 12:01am

      https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-future-of-food-the-mccartneys-tips-on-how-to-eat-more-sustainably-sjqnt2l59?fbclid=IwAR3ujGdw_pLMFuXPAxwbZ9Net7RtABfEvkFgB3nP3YgKtohuF4N9krGdj_I

       (from left) the chef Douglas McMaster, Mary McCartney, Sir Paul McCartney, Stella McCartney, rapper Ben Coyle-Larner (Loyle Carner) and the climate activist Anna Taylor

      The veggie table: (from left) the chef Douglas McMaster, Mary McCartney, Sir Paul McCartney, Stella McCartney, rapper Ben Coyle-Larner (Loyle Carner) and the climate activist Anna Taylor (JENNY ZARINS)

       

      The McCartney family are passionate about the planet. From the Meat Free Monday campaign Sir Paul launched with his daughters Stella and Mary to Stella’s Today for Tomorrow award for young activists combating climate change, they wear their eco-credentials on their sleeve.

      It was their idea to bring together a group of like-minded people to discuss sustainability — and in particular how we think about the future of food. It’s a hot topic right now, with the exhibition Food: Bigger than the Plate at the V&A and the publication of the Jonathan Safran Foer book We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast.

       

      Is the McCartneys’ Meat Free Monday the way forward? Sir Paul says: “When we started Meat Free Monday, the idea was this is doable, so let’s hope people can do this. If you look at the period between then and now … it’s on fire!” His enthusiasm is clear. “If people start to do it on a small scale, they miss meat one day, then find that it’s a bit more affordable, and they learn from it.”

      The McCartneys were, of course, brought up on a plant-based diet after their late mother, Linda, converted to vegetarianism in the 1970s. Her brand, Linda McCartney Foods, is still going strong after 30 years, as Stella explains: “She put veggie food in the frozen aisle and she made it affordable.” Stella acknowledges the difficulty of privileged people seeming preachy about sustainability. “If we want people to go veggie, we need to educate them. We need to inspire them, make it look sexy, make it look cool, and make it accessible.”

       

      The McCartneys reveal their vegetarian Christmas in the next issue of The Dish, out December 1